Design in Public Spaces Final with Jill Nussbaum, Spring 2011. In collaboration with Benjamin Gadbaw, Cooper Smith, and Catherine Young.

 

Challenge

Create a networked, mobile, or interactive installation that uses sport tracking data to improve the experience of either biking, running, or walking in NYC. Consider how athletic data might be used to create awareness for athletes that share the city streets, affect transportation policy, and improve overall city health.

 

Approach

Once we decided as a group to focus on runners, we began our process by conducting landscape research to determine what products already existed for tracking running data, as well as what kinds of initiatives and support are available for runners. We followed this with field interviews by splitting into two teams and targeting popular NYC running destinations (Central Park and the Westside Highway). We also took measures to interview runners who don’t live in NYC but have visited the area before. Once we had our research and insights collected and analyzed, we ideated on several concepts, before narrowing down to one and creating a final user journey video.

Four key insights derived from our research and analysis drove our train of thought throughout the process:

1) New Yorkers are proud of their neighborhoods;
2) New York is a city for runners, but there are obvious drawbacks;
3) Runners, competitive and casual alike, love races. While runners enjoy their individual runs, they like to be part of a larger group and/or cause;
4) Data tracking is under-utilized even by the casual athlete. The potential of data tracking is yet to be maximized.

Based on our key insights, we concluded that we needed to create an experience that enables runners to overcome the major obstacles of running in NY. We can do this by connecting neighborhood pride and a love of running for a larger group or cause. With that, we arrived at our final concept, NYC vs NYC.

Outcome

NYC vs NYC is an app that makes teammates of neighbors and opponents out of neighborhoods. Participants join their neighborhood to conquer as much of New York as possible in a Risk-like gameplay. Using Nike+ GPS tracking, participants claim territory by running through the city, conquering roads, trails, and bridges for their neighborhood.

    Conducting a KJ analysis of our findings

    Conducting a KJ analysis of our findings

    Mapping NYC vs NYC to our key insights

    Mapping NYC vs NYC to our key insights

    User journey map of NYC vs NYC

    User journey map of NYC vs NYC

    If our user was a shoe, he/she would be the kind that's tucked away in someone's closet, though still accessible and ready to be taken out for a run

    If our user was a shoe, he/she would be the kind that's tucked away in someone's closet, though still accessible and ready to be taken out for a run

    We split into two teams to interview runners in NYC's popular running destinations (Central Park and the Westside Highway)

    We split into two teams to interview runners in NYC's popular running destinations (Central Park and the Westside Highway)

    We interviewed a number of subjects, both in NYC and those familiar with NYC

    We interviewed a number of subjects, both in NYC and those familiar with NYC

    Rough sketch for our first draft of our user journey video

    Rough sketch for our first draft of our user journey video

    Wireframing the app interface

    Wireframing the app interface

    Sketch for our final user journey video

    Sketch for our final user journey video

    Final User Journey

    View our final user journey video.